CC.006.L.2 | The Sword Introduced

This was the first chunk of Charlotte’s Journey I started writing; our introduction to the accord sword, and possibly the first time we’ll see magic affect the world. It also gives us a lot of insight into Charlotte’s thoughts, her relationship with Lucinda (and maybe Vilnius, too); not to mention monks, ceremony, and blood. Though it’s clear it still needs a lot of polish (it is a first draft, after all), I feel I was able to really capture Augusto’s voice in the end…

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Luke’s Monomyth Story Treatment

After ideation, several potential story treatments, and a whole lot of back and forth, James and I settled on a rough setting / adventure for our hero, Prota (later to be named Charlotte; but that’s another story). Since my initial idea was to see if we could tell a worthwhile story using Joseph Campbell’s monomyth structure, I suggested we each create another story treatment that spoke to the Hero’s Journey story beats. (And I was prepared to hang up on James if he suggested we do it 3 times each.) The following is what I came up with. Continue reading “Luke’s Monomyth Story Treatment”

Refined Monomyth Ideation #3 – Luke: Prota, This Time It Gets Personal

After Luke and James each wrote three story treatments for what would become Charlotte’s Journey, James suggested that they should each take the best parts of that initial round of idea development and write three more story treatments.

Here’s my third attempt. Reading it again now, I can only say it’s not my favourite (and, frankly—not that personal). Like I said, I struggled with variations on a single idea; make it the same but different (but not too the same, and definitely not too different). Most of the details in this treatment were destined for the cutting room floor, though I still like the idea of Prota’s dad and The Villain being rival inventors playing with the natural magic in this world.
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Refined Monomyth Ideation #2 – Luke: Prota, The Bride (Enter the Wedding…)

After Luke and James each wrote three story treatments for what would become Charlotte’s Journey, James suggested that they should each take the best parts of that initial round of idea development and write three more story treatments.

Here’s my second attempt. If you’ve read James’ Treatise: On Magic in this world, you can probably guess it came shortly after he read my ideas here. What can I say—I like mountains and big scary fireballs.

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Refined Monomyth Ideation #1 – Luke: Prota, The Ambassadors’ Daughter

After Luke and James each wrote three story treatments for what would become Charlotte’s Journey, James suggested that they should each take the best parts of that initial round of idea development and write three more story treatments.

This was the first idea I came up with when James asked us to concoct three different story outlines each. If you look at what Charlotte’s Journey is becoming, you’ll see a lot of ideas got their start here—before influences from the other outlines, and brainstorming back and forth between James and I, made them better, different, or nothing at all.

I read this for the first time since we initially did this exercise—Charlotte’s Journey sure has come a long way. Continue reading “Refined Monomyth Ideation #1 – Luke: Prota, The Ambassadors’ Daughter”

Getting Started – Luke: 3 Variations on a Theme

When we started this project, I approached James with three variables—one, we write a story that adheres to the beats of Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth, two, our protagonist is a woman, and three, there’s a GIANT sword the protagonist can’t use. He agreed to all three, and suggested we each come up with three ideas on how these variables could work together to become a story.

The following are Luke’s first three ideas, in all their hideous glory. You’ll see notes to myself, to James, and the rise and abandonment of thoughts as I was writing them. James is right—I never really did this when crafting stories (up until this point). I get an idea, and I go with it (perhaps why a mountain shows up in two versions below; plus, kind of in the 3rd one too), never thinking about how it could be done differently (and thus missing out on all sorts of great ideas). This was really good exercise for me because I found it very hard to do—which can be summed up in five words, “Similar start to Idea #1…” Continue reading “Getting Started – Luke: 3 Variations on a Theme”

Charlotte’s Journey As Cue Cards

After months of planning over Skype, we finally had the chance to meet in person to talk Charlotte’s Journey at the start of July 2015. We called it “The Summit”, complete with agenda and goals, intending to discuss Adventures in Storytelling as a whole (the website, the process, building the community, etc.) and be ready for the next phase of the plan. (Plus, we drew this cool map.)

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Character Sketch: Charlotte Hargrave

The character sketches were a collaborative effort; a rough road map to understanding our characters. As we continued to co-write Charlotte’s Journey, this was a way to keep the “shape”, or a baseline, of a character in mind; so we didn’t create two competing arcs as we wrote first drafts.

Committing a character sketch to “paper” always felt like a good idea to me—to capture the history, thoughts, feelings, and character arc all in one place—but for some reason, I never tried it until now. Will it work? Does it allow for growth in a character? Do we rewrite it as the story evolves? With Charlotte, we’re going to find out. Continue reading “Character Sketch: Charlotte Hargrave”

The Email That Started It All

The day was March 12, 2015. I was walking home from work, contemplating the inevitable yet no less heartbreaking news: Sir Terry Pratchett had passed away. Sir Terry represented 50% of my personal writing heroes, so you must understand I was staggered by the gaping hole he left behind in literature and my soul. How could we, as a species, hope to fill this void? How does one person come to be as skilled, intelligent, delightful, and insightful as he was through each of his works?

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